Knowing what’s going on inside your head

What’s wrong with me?

Knowing what’s going on inside your head

What’s wrong with me?

Article approved by Stéphanie Deslauriers,
psychoeducator, speaker et author.

October 2020

Lately, you haven’t been your usual self: you’re more anxious, more tired, more irritable, and that has you worried. Or perhaps you haven’t noticed anything different, but a friend or family member pointed out a change in your behaviour, and you’ve been thinking about it ever since.

 

How to tell if you’re feeling blue or if you’re depressed

When you’re going through a tough time, whether it’s starting high school, fighting with a friend, going through a break-up or enduring your parents’ separation, it’s normal to feel sad, anxious, angry or tired. But then you focus on other things, a few days go by and, after a while, you perk up and start to feel better. This is called temporary depression.

Everyone goes through it. And while it may not be fun, it means that you’re human and that you feel emotions. These bouts of the blues can also serve a purpose, creating an opportunity for self-reflection, better decision-making in the future and the development of new coping strategies.

When you’re depressed, you experience several symptoms of feeling blue, but in a more intense way and with no improvement over time. Sometimes, the symptoms can even worsen.

What are the signs of depression in teens?

What are the signs of depression in teens?

One sign that can help you recognize depression is a change in behaviour. That’s when you change (gradually or suddenly) and, as a result, you’re no longer able to function like before in school, at home or with your friends. Your emotions, your behaviour and your way of thinking all change. Everything seems more intense, harder, and you feel like there’s no way you can handle all the challenges that life is throwing at you.
What’s more, the things you love no longer make you happy like they used to. You think things will never get better, which can cause a feeling of hopelessness and an emptiness inside.
And because there’s been a change in how you felt before compared to what you’re experiencing now, you no longer recognize yourself.

Here are the 13 signs and symptoms of depression in teens.

If these symptoms persist, become more intense or prevent you from functioning in the different areas of your life, and there’s no sign of improvement, you might be going through a depression.

Here are the 13 signs and symptoms of depression in teens.

If these symptoms persist, become more intense or prevent you from functioning in the different areas of your life, and there’s no sign of improvement, you might be going through a depression.

Be careful not to self-diagnose:

As you can see, it’s easy to identify with the signs of depression as many are commonplace, like a character trait or the symptoms of a temporary depression (which, as mentioned earlier, will go away with time).

What’s more, having trouble concentrating, being tired all the time, and feeling sluggish or apathetic can also be symptoms of mononucleosis, anemia, diabetes or a thyroid disorder. That’s why it’s important to talk with a doctor or psychologist (lien vers la page Ressource) when you notice a change in your behaviour.

Taking this step can be challenging, but keep in mind that you need to persevere. Because depression is reversible.

What are the risk factors for depression in teens?

Depression in teens is caused by a multitude of factors that influence one another:

  • Issues with family or friends
  • Bullying of any kind
  • Pressure to succeed
  • Use of drugs or alcohol
  • Questions about your sexual orientation or gender identity
  • Inherited traits (if one of your parents has suffered from depression, you’re slightly more at risk; but that just means you’re predisposed, as with many other illnesses).

The causes of teenage depression are different for everyone and sometimes you may not even know the cause—that’s why it’s important not to judge what others are going through.

Why don’t you always feel like talking about it🤭 ?

Sometimes, when things aren’t going well, you don’t feel like talking about it. When you’re suffering from depression, you can feel the same way. You might also be afraid of being judged or be worried what others might think of you. Or you might think it’ll just go away with time. Also, if you don’t understand what’s going on with you, you might have trouble expressing what you’re feeling. Keep in mind that talking about it is the first step to getting better.

 

 

That’s why, when you’re with someone who’s going through a depression, it’s important to listen 🙋 🙋‍♂️ without judging them.

Want to take stock of your situation ✋ ?

Complete the following test to see where you’re at. Remember, if your situation is weighing on you and preventing you from functioning normally, you don’t have to suffer—there are many solutions available.

DEPRESSION TEST

Do I have depression?”

Take the following depression quiz to get some insight into how you’re feeling:

Get started

Learn about the contributor’s book

Éli : comprendre la dépression à l’adolescence – Stéphanie Deslauriers, Psychoeducator, speaker and writer

This book is a practical guide that can help teens recognize the signs and risks of depression, feel less alone and, above all, find concrete tips for how to rebuild a positive self-image and move forward.

BUY THE BOOK ↗

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