Getting better

Where can you turn to talk to someone about depression, anxiety or having the blues?

Getting better

Where can you turn to talk to someone about depression, anxiety or having the blues?

Approved by doctor Frédéric Benoit, psychiatrist

Not feeling so great these days? Or maybe you just have a few questions about your mental health? Well, you’re on this page, and that’s the first step towards figuring things out. Here are some information that might help you voice what you’re going through and find solutions. Because, yes, there are solutions!

Why is it so difficult to talk to your parents or others about depression?

Why is it so difficult to talk to your parents or others about depression?

There are a number of reasons why you might be reluctant to talk about your mental health:

  • Fear of being judged
  • Fear of being seen as weak or unable to deal with your problems
  • Difficulty talking about your emotions
  • Bad experiences in the past
  • Fear of worrying or disappointing those around you
  • Fear that everyone at school will know
  • Believing it will pass over time
  • Thinking that nothing will change
  • Fear of the unknown (what will happen when we talk about it, or afterward)
  • Worrying that you might be diagnosed with something
  • Concerns about treatment if you are
  • Worrying that you’ll need to take antidepressants

First step towards getting better

Or maybe you don’t want to talk about your problems for cultural or religious reasons, or simply to protect your image. It’s normal to have fears—but you need to get over them. Talking is the FIRST STEP towards getting better. The majority of people who seek help with their mental health find a solution.

Did you know?

Around 75% of young people with depression are not getting help, because they don’t talk about it.

 

⚠️ BUT ⚠️

These days, 80%–90% of people diagnosed with clinical depression can be effectively treated through medication or psychotherapy, which is an incredibly high success rate for any mental health disorder.. Clearly, it’s worth talking about!

How can you start talking?

How can you start talking?

As you now know, it’s very important to talk to people you trust when you need help figuring out how to deal with depression: for instance, your parents or your best friend. Depression is an illness that is difficult to cure if you’re all alone as a teenager. But remember: 👉 it’s NEVER too late.

Take your time, but take a chance! When you’re ready to talk, you can:

  • Tell someone, clearly 🎤, directly and out loud, that things aren’t going well (you’ll be surprised at the reaction!)
  • 🖍 Write a letter or a text or email instead of speaking out loud (this gives you a chance to organize your thoughts)
  • Discuss your problem while you’re doing something else (🏒 playing a sport, 🥯 having a meal, 🎮 playing video games, etc.)

What can you say?

Then, be sure to create a safety net to catch you if you fall! There really is strength in numbers. Talk to more than one person you trust to get as much support as you can. It could be a friend, a teacher or a coach. Of course, talking to your parents about depression (if you have a good relationship with them) or another family member is a good idea, too.

At this point, having support from anyone will help. If you have the blues or feel depressed, support from those around you can help you get through it. If you are going through an actual depression and the symptoms don’t go away, you need to take action and get help from a professional: staff at your school, a family doctor, or a psychologist. All these options are good, so decide based on what’s available to you.

Teenage depression: Help for teens looking for a professional to talk to

Teenage depression: Help for teens looking for a professional to talk to

As discussed earlier, you might be reluctant to seek help. If you avoid this step and feel better after a while, you may believe your depression can be left untreated. On the other hand, if you need treatment and you don’t get it, you are more fragile and at risk of a relapse.

Here are some resources that can help:

  • Integrated Health and Social Services Centres (CISSS), which offer free services to teens
  • Info-Social 811
  • Walk-in medical clinics
  • Your family doctor
  • Community organizations
  • Youth centres
  • Free, confidential help lines like Tel-Jeunes, most of which are available 24/7
  • You can also search online for resources in your neighbourhood or region.

As you can see, there are plenty of options! It goes to show that there is more than one way to get help. You might not be sure which one is best for you—but the important thing is that you get a diagnosis and find a plan of treatment. For resources in your area, click here.

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